Many insects are vulnerable or endangered. At current rates of decline, there may be no more insects in a century. In Harmony Sustainable Landscapes

Many insects are vulnerable or endangered. At current rates of decline, all insects may be extinct in a century.

Insects could completely disappear within a century if the current rate of decline continues, according to a scientific review reported in The Guardian.

The first global scientific review found that “the world’s insects are hurtling down the path to extinction.” This threatens a ‘catastrophic collapse of nature’s ecosystems,'” The Guardian said.

Insects are “essential” for ecosystems to function, the researchers say. They provide food for birds, fish and other wildlife. They pollinate most of the food we eat. Insects also recycle nutrients.

“More than 40% of insect species are declining and a third are endangered,” The Guardian continued. “The rate of extinction is eight times faster than that of mammals, birds and reptiles. The total mass of insects is falling by a precipitous 2.5% a year. . . . They could vanish within a century.”

Butterflies, moths, bees, wasps and dung beetles are among the species most affected. Several aquatic species are also declining. The review was published in the April 2019 issue of the peer-reviewed journal Biological Conservation.

Drivers of insect declines 

How you can help

 

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